Dynamic System Status Management

System Status Management (SSM) is the fluid deployment of ambulances based on the hour-of-the-day and day-of-the-week in order to match supply, defined as Unit Hours of Utilization (UHU), with expected demand, expressed as calls for service, in the attempt to provide faster response by locating ambulances at “posts” nearer their next calls. While the practice is still notunanimously embraced by all services, it has a sound foundation both in theresearch literature dating back to the 1980′s as well as in practice today. Experience has shown that ambulance response times can be dramatically decreased using this type of dynamic deployment, but it is also recognized that it is possible to reduce performance when these techniques are not applied properly. The direction of the results of a system implementation are typically influenced by the system design, competence of the managers creating the plan, and commitment of the workforce in implementing it. Therefore the best practice is a simple and straightforward implementation that will show positive results quickly. This methodology ensures a positive return on investment along with garnering the necessary buy-in from staff to make the project a success.

In his article, “System Status Management – The Fact is, It’s Everywhere“, published in the Journal of EMS (JEMS) magazine back in 1989, Jack Stout explained the concept of SSM and tried todispelcertain myths. Based on foreseen Geographic Information System (GIS) technology and even general computing capabilities of that time, it was quite logical to assume in his Myth #2 that “no matter how thoroughly the response zone concept is fine-tuned in practice, it cannot be made to cope effectively with the dynamic realties of the EMS environment.” But systems implemented today around the US are capable of calculating dynamic response zones in a small fraction of a second while even being based on time-aware historic driving patterns making a truly dynamic system status management process a reality. A practical and proven example of a dynamically functioning system status management application is the Mobile Area Vehicle Routing and Location Information System, or simply MARVLIS.

The following Slideshare presentation does an excellent job of telling the story of why and how the system works:

High Performance EMS is MARVLIS[slideshare id=8765718&w=425&h=355&sc=no]

View more presentations from hp_ems

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High Performance EMS

High Performance Emergency Medical Services (HP-EMS) systems provide effective clinical care promoting positive patient outcomes and community wellness while maintaining a focus on improving economic efficiency of the system.  This site is dedicated as a community seeking to increase agency performance by promoting useful information regarding the developing trends and improvements in the efficiency of delivering basic and advanced medical care in the field.

Comments
Joey
Static v. Dynamic: A Continuum of Cost
There are pros and cons with each model but the bottom line comes down to optimizing your EMS system and delivering rapid care within a cost efficient model. I have always worked in a drama series called "housewives of a static system" as well as in a nationally recognized dynamic system and I can honestly…
2014-08-26 06:31:07
David
Static v. Dynamic: A Continuum of Cost
John Brophy is that you.... If having a sustainable funding source , money for research, proper equipment like power cots, video laryngoscopes, state retirement, community education funding, and not eating and pooping in a gas station makes me Emergency. Then Rampart I need orders for a lobotomy. If running more calls to bill Medicare and…
2014-08-23 18:41:36
David
Is ‘SSM’ Still a ‘Bad Idea’?
If it's such a great idea why hasn't Fire Dept embraced it?
2014-08-23 14:19:25
Todd
Static v. Dynamic: A Continuum of Cost
David...I agree with John and Roger. EMS is a business and we've got to start treating it that way. The days of sitting around the station waiting for a call have come and gone. To be efficient you've got to be out in your service where the calls happen. This is the future of EMS…
2014-08-23 13:55:46
John
Static v. Dynamic: A Continuum of Cost
I thought Johnny and Roy retired in the 70's. People with a mindset like yours are what keeps the paramedicine profession from evolving like the other emergency services have. The definition of insanity...doing the same things over and over expecting something different to happen.
2014-08-23 10:53:29

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