Influencing Paramedics on Twitter

I like lists. They are typically neat and definitive. I am sure that my friend @ChecklistMedic would agree that they also help bring order to the chaos that often defines our work in the field. For those of us trying to leverage social media to keep current on EMS thought (or Community Paramedicine or Mobile Integrated Healthcare), Twitter can be a chaotic cacophony of voices. While there is some value in all those voices, my time limits how many I can actively engage each day. Consequently, I look forward to each Friday when my timeline fills with thoughtful suggestions of Friday Follows (#FF). Please note that I said thoughtful suggestions. That certainly does not include the pandering lists of accounts that simply retweeted you this week or include some implied quid pro quo of mentions. So when I heard about a service called Little Bird that creates lists of influential social media accounts, I decided to give it a try. Unlike Klout, that is heavily activity-based and compares all users against all other users for a universal ranking, this new service ranks users based on relationships and topics of discussion.

Not surprisingly, my first list was focused on EMS, but I was surprised to find that many accounts appearing near the top of that list did not actually discuss EMS topics. While they have some involvement in EMS, I was really hoping to discover the accounts that shared ideas and thoughts on the condition and improvement of the field many of us still name as Emergency Medical Services. After some tweaking I created a second version. This list moved several of my own favorite accounts further down the ranking and other unsuspecting accounts appeared. I still hope to get all that worked out, but I decided to switch tactics for the moment and chose the topic as Paramedic instead. This avoided many of the accounts that simply refer to EMS without actually taking part in its development. Paramedics have the vested interest I wanted, but the inconsistency with which we use the term in the United States skewed the results to include a more international flavor. Maybe that isn’t always so bad though. We need to learn from each other and reach outside our comfort zones. So today, this is my #FF list!

The Top 100 Influencers of the Paramedic Topic on Twitter:

1. @jemsconnect
2. @Paramedic_Mike
3. @Chroniclesofems
4. @Ldn_Ambulance
5. @EMS12Lead
6. @paramedic_tutor
7. @EMS1
8. @iParamedic
9. @NYCEMSwebsite
10. @InsomniacMedic
11. @EMSWorldNews
12. @ParamedicComp
13. @gfriese
14. @ParamedicsUK
15. @TorontoEMS
16. @OntParamedic
17. @hp_ems
18. @CdnParamedicine
19. @setla
20. @theHappyMedic
21. @OntarioMedic
22. @EMSBlogs
23. @PAC_Paramedic
24. @scottthemedic
25. @Ornge
26. @podmedic
27. @AmboDriver
28. @flobach
29. @geekymedic
30. @RescueDigest
31. @UKAmbulance
32. @TPAnews
33. @sunmedicgirl
34. @Paradan
35. @jods10503
36. @LDNairamb
37. @hemsparamedics
38. @zollemsfire
39. @rescue_monkey
40. @Sham00911
41. @MedicSBK
42. @Ambulance_news
43. @tbouthillet
44. @romduck
45. @BOSTON_EMS
46. @Pell_Paramedics
47. @NiagaraMedics
48. @JEFF_EMT
49. @EMSEduCast
50. @WeParamedics
51. @UKMedic999
52. @cmedik
53. @AmbulanceJunkie
54. @911_redhead
55. @OAPC2014
56. @TEMATrust
57. @WpgParamedics
58. @CPBSOfficial
59. @OFFICALWMAS
60. @PenguinEMT
61. @unwiredmedic
62. @SteveWhitehead
63. @stjohnambulance
64. @diagnosisLOB
65. @SendAParamedic
66. @Ambulanceman1
67. @MsParamedic
68. @gfriese
69. @TheBHF
70. @ParaPractice
71. @NancyEPerry
72. @MattTheMedic
73. @ParaACP
74. @gregmedic1
75. @NWAmbulance
76. @PedroParamedic
77. @IrishParamedic_
78. @hybridmedic
79. @clchjan31
80. @ssgjbroyles
81. @NiagaraEMS
82. @SamBradley11
83. @chicagomedic
84. @paramedicpaul
85. @ChiefDiMonte
86. @North_IndMedics
87. @FossilMedic
88. @Ckemtp
89. @ParamedicAssoc
90. @EMS_Louisa
91. @K9kazoo
92. @PerthCoEMS
93. @Paramedic_Daily
94. @Jeramedic
95. @MedicCat
96. @999flymo
97. @emsgarage
98. @RedCross
99. @Stroppyambo
100. @CAWParamedic

Watch for more lists to come.

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Comments
Rob Lawrence
What is CAEMS and Why Should I Care?
Also catch the CAEMS panel at EMS Today in Feb 2015 also. Will have a few too name lined up for the panel.
2014-12-22 11:56:19
daleloberger
Culture of Safety
The idea of changing administrative behavior at the very core of how they function regarding issues of safety is also seen in the promotion of a "Just Culture" in EMS. The Center for Patient Safety discusses this idea at their website: http://www.centerforpatientsafety.org/just-culture-in-ems/
2014-12-19 18:09:59
daleloberger
Community-Based Programs
How EMS can become a financially stable function of a local government is a hot topic right now. Jamie Davis discusses the NAEMT efforts towards changing the funding stream from the federal level in this podcast: http://www.mediccast.com/blog/2014/12/19/naemt-wants-congress-and-the-president-to-fund-ems/
2014-12-19 18:06:14
daleloberger
Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
It only takes one bad story like this: http://www.emsworld.com/video/12029267/philadelphia-paramedic-in-hot-water-over-anti-police-image to make the public question a whole service (or even incite violence.) If your service doesn't already have a social networking presence, how can you effectively counter such bad media? You need to engage before problems arise in order to have credibility and a voice when…
2014-12-18 13:51:43
Mark
How To Perform CPR: The Crucial Steps You Should Know (and Share!)
The majority of people who survive a cardiac arrest are resuscitated from ventricular fibrillation (VF) by the administration of a defibrillatory shock. This is most likely to be successful when it is given very soon after the onset of VF; emergency service personnel are often unable to arrive soon enough to help a victim. Automated…
2014-12-16 17:32:19

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